Jojune Battle Tendency: Episode 11- Caesar’s Lonely Youth

CAAEEESAAAAAAR!!!

Yes, ladies and gentlemen, sad to say we lose our favorite Italian, bubble blowing, Hamon user in this episode, resulting in what may very well be one of the most heartbreaking moments in Jojo. We’ll talk more about why that is in a second, but let’s talk about this episode first.

Caesar’s Lonely Youth starts things off with, well, Caesar’s lonely youth. 

Caesar grew up in a traditional Italian family with a pretty normal childhood upbringing until he turned ten. Then, his father and son of Will Zeppeli, Mario Zeppeli, suddenly abandoned the family. Months before this, Caesar’s mother had passed away, and family members stole what money they had left after his father’s disappearance. Caesar then turned to a life crime following these events. 

However, at the age of sixteen, he happened to run into his father. He followed him into the lower floors of the Colosseum, where the Pillar Men were kept. Mario ends up being killed by the Pillar Men but manages to save Caesar and tell him to go to Venice and find Lisa Lisa to understand what was going on.  

We then cut back to Caesar, who arrives at the hotel, with Meshina not too far behind to stop him. However, the two are attacked by Wamuu. Meshina is taken out of the fight, but Caesar is still standing and peruses him inside. 

A fierce battle rages between them. Unfortunately, Caesar is attacked by Wamuu’s Divine Sandstorm attack and is left gravely injured. He uses the last of his Hamon to send the ring containing the antidote to Wamuu’s poison ring and his own scarf to Jojo and Lisa Lisa before he’s crushed under a massive boulder. Jojo and Lisa Lisa arrive on the scene only to find Caesar’s remains and what’s left of the fight and grieve over the loss of the Hamon User and first great JoBro of the franchise.

Caesar’s death really is a sad moment here. That, and his death is particularly brutal. I mean, getting scarred beyond belief by Wamuu is terrible enough. 

But then you add the boulder. It’s like if the Divine Sandstorm didn’t kill him, you know that boulder sure did. But it’s not so much the actual death itself, what Caesar does before he dies, or even when Jojo and Lisa Lisa arrive that makes this such a sad moment. 

I personally think it’s when they find Caesar’s body that makes it sad. Or rather, when they see the boulder that Caesar’s body is under. 

Before that moment happens, they know-or at least have a feeling-that Caesar is gone. But, initially, they don’t really react with that much sorrow when they realize it. 

That’s not to say that they don’t care or don’t feel anything. On the contrary, for all Jojo’s scolding of her, he can tell that Lisa Lisa is pretty torn up, but she won’t show it. But when they notice the boulder and the blood seeping out from under it, both of them break down. Why this makes this moment so sad is knowing that they now know how Caesar died. They don’t just know he’s dead; they know how he died. And it pushes them, and the audience to an extent, over.

That aside, the fight between Caesar and Wamuu is a great moment. These two put up one helluva fight. Both of them effectively use their skills to take out the other. But in the end, Wamuu ended up having the upper hand. Many people would say that it’s one of the best fights in Jojo, but I would have to disagree as there are other great fights here in Battle Tendency that would top it. I guess it’s because the fight ends with Caesar’s death that it’s become so memorable. Still, this is a great fight, but I’ve seen better. And if nothing else, too, Wamuu knows when to walk away, even though Caesar constantly puts on that he could still go another round.

Containing one of the most heartbreaking brutal deaths in Jojo as well as one incredible fight, Caesar’s Lonely Youth is a great episode. Enough said there.  Stay tuned tomorrow as I cover a hopefully not-so-gloomy episode as things between Jojo and Wamuu finally begin!

-Hanime on Anime

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